Annual Title I Schoolwide Plan

Revised 10/27/17

Title I schools implementing schoolwide programs are required to develop schoolwide plans in accordance with Section 1114(b) of the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA).  Guidelines for plan development include the following:

  • The plan should be developed with the involvement of:
    • Parents;
    • Other members of the community to be served;
    • Individuals who will carry out the plan, including teachers, principals, other school leaders, administrators, paraprofessionals present in the school;
    • The local education agency;
    • To the extent feasible, tribes and tribal organizations present in the community; and
    • If appropriate
      • Specialized instructional support personnel;
      • Technical assistance providers;
      • School staff; and
      • If the plan relates to a secondary school, students and other individuals determined by the school;
  • The plan should be available to the Local Educational Agency (LEA), parents, and the public; information in the plan should be in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a language that parents can understand; and
  • If appropriate and applicable, the plan should be developed in coordination and integration with other federal, state, and local services, resources, and  programs, such as programs supported under ESSA, violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start programs, adult education programs, career and technical education programs, and schools implementing comprehensive support and improvement activities or targeted support and improvement activities under section 1111(d).

The ESEA requires four components to be included in the schoolwide plan. The template below provides a framework that may be used to develop and/or update a schoolwide plan. For each component, the narrative section in the template should be completed in sufficient detail to document how the component has been thoroughly and thoughtfully addressed. Schoolwide plans should be reviewed annually and revised as necessary to promote continuous improvement and to reflect the school’s initiatives to upgrade the entire educational program of the school.

To maintain focus, eliminate duplication of effort, and promote comprehensiveness, schools should operate under a single plan if at all possible. A school that already has a plan for school improvement might consider amending it, rather than starting over, provided that the existing plan was based on a comprehensive needs assessment and can be revised to include the four required schoolwide components. This template can be used by schools with existing Indistar® plans to reference indicators and tasks in the Indistar® plan that related to the schoolwide components.

Directions: Complete each of the four components by following these steps:

Using Indistar®:

  • Access the Title I Schoolwide Plan template from the “Complete Form” tab of the Indistar® dashboard.
  • Provide a narrative response that describes how the school has addressed the requirements for each component;
  • Where applicable, identify the indicator(s) and task number(s) from the school’s Indistar® plan that align with each required component;
  • Click “Save” at the bottom of the form to save your responses; and
  • Submit the plan to your LEA Division Contact by returning to the dashboard. Under the “Submit Forms/Reports” tab, go to the Title I Plans section, and select the Title I Schoolwide Plan “Submit” button.

NotUsing Indistar®:

  • Access the Title I Schoolwide Plan template on the Title I website.
  • Provide a narrative response that describes how the school has addressed the requirements for each component; and
  • Submit the plan as directed by your LEA Title I Coordinator.

Resources

Schoolwide program resources, including USED guidance on Designing Schoolwide Programs, Supporting School Reform by Leveraging Federal Funds in a Schoolwide Program, and Title I Fiscal Issues, can be accessed at the Title I website under Guidelines and Procedures/Federal Guidance.

A Virginia Department of Education presentation on Requirements and Implementation of a Title I Schoolwide Program can be accessed at:  http://www.doe.virginia.gov/federal_programs/esea/index.shtml.

Component 1 §1114(b)(6):

A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school that takes into account information on the academic achievement of children in relation to the challenging state academic standards, particularly the needs of those children who are failing, or are at-risk of failing, to meet the challenging state academic standards and any other factors as determined by the Local Educational Agency.

Evidence: A systematic effort involving multiple stakeholders to acquire an accurate and thorough picture of strengths and weaknesses of the school community, thus identifying student needs through a variety of information-gathering techniques. A data analysis summary must be included which incorporates benchmarks used to evaluate program results. The results of your data analysis must guide the reform strategies that you will implement to improve instruction for all students.

Narrative

Systematic effort to involve stakeholders

As a part of the School Improvement Planning process, the school leadership team and RI Core team both reviewed and analyzed data from the 2016-2017 school year. Grade level teams created SMARTR goals related to the SIIP goals and individual teachers created SMARTR goals aligned with these school-wide goals. Overarching strategies were shared with our families during Back to School Night, and a PTA meeting.

Summary of analysis and identified needs based on a variety of data sources

To obtain a clear picture of the current strengths and areas for growth for our school, the following data and analysis are based on current year data from SOLs, iReady, MRA and DRA.

Mathematics SOL assessment results for grades 3 through 6 show significant gaps in achievement for our black and Hispanic students, as well as special education (SWD) students in grade 3, 4 and 5 when compared to white and Asian students. This indicates a need to focus on mathematics achievement for students in these demographic groups. Further analysis reveals a large achievement gap in all grades, but particularly in grades 3 and 5. As in the upper grades, Mathematics Reasoning Assessment (MRA) data from grades 1 and 2 illustrates achievement gaps in both grades for our Black, SWD, and LEP students when compared to our White and Asian students. This indicates a need to focus on mathematics achievement with those groups of students at the primary grades. Students in these groups will be monitored closely to improve demographic group performance in primary mathematics.

End of year DRA2 assessment results for grades K through 6 were analyzed with a lens on SWD and EL. Based on data, these subgroups were selected as they are the lowest performing in reading. The data shows significant gaps in achievement for students with disabilities when compared to all students, demonstrating a need to concentrate supports on meeting the needs of these groups of students in literacy, particularly in rising third through sixth graders. This indicates a need to focus on literacy development with these students so that the gaps do not continue to widen. These individual students in the Hispanic, SWD, and EL demographic groups will continue to be monitored for areas of support they may need through the use of the school Responsive Instruction (RI) Core Team. Students receiving special education services will also continue to be monitored to improve demographic group performance in both primary and upper literacy.

Based on the reading and mathematics data above, Centre Ridge Elementary has set the following Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-oriented, and Time-bound (SMART) goals for student growth and performance.

Performance Indicators – SMART GOALS (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-Oriented, and Time-Bound)

MATHEMATICS By June 2018, 100% of students in grades K-6 will make progress on the school-created math performance task rubric as determined below: Students scoring between 0 - 3 total points will increase at least 2 points Student scoring between 4 – 8 total points will increase at least 3 points Students scoring between 9 – 12 total points will maintain or increase their overall score

READING By Spring 2018, 75% of students identified at risk by the universal screener in reading (at or below the 39th percentile) will make more than one year’s progress as measured by school-created DRA2 growth chart found in our SIIP.

INNOVATION GOAL: By June 2018, 100% of students in grades K-6 will make progress on the POG communicator rubric as determined below: Students scoring between 15 - 17 total points will increase at least 2 points Students scoring between 18 - 20 will at least maintain their overall score All other students will increase at least three points or move to the next level on the rubric:

  • 0-5 emerging
  • 6 - 10 developing
  • 11-15 proficient
  • 16- 20- exemplary

Budget Implications: In order to support the academic growth of all students, as well as targeted subgroups, funds from the Title I budget will be used for one Instructional Coach, one Literacy Resource Teacher and one Math Resource Teacher, data dialogue and curriculum planning day hourly pay for teachers and funding seats for teachers to attend LETRS training.

Component 2 §1114(b)(7)(A)(i):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that provide opportunities for all children, including each of the subgroups of students (as defined in section 1111(c)(2)) to meet the challenging state academic standards.

Evidence: Scientifically-based research strategies based on identified needs and designed to raise the achievement level of all students on content standards. Provide information on how the selected strategies will increase student achievement in underperforming subgroups, if applicable. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative

Strengthening the core academic program

As a result of the above data analysis we have identified the following strategies that will strengthen core instruction and increase student achievement in underperforming subgroups:

Mathematics: Based on the data analysis above, the following practices were identified as ones that would strengthen student achievement in mathematics.

  • Math Workshop: Differentiated Math Workshop will provide students the opportunity to practice math skills at their current level of understanding while expecting them to deepen their level of understanding. This model puts students at the center of the instruction, and gives them ample time to problem solve, learn with their peers and be deeply engaged in learning math concepts. In classes with special education inclusion support, this also allows for a double dip of instruction for students with gaps.
  • In weekly grade level teams, CLT meetings will be used to map curriculum, unpack standards for instruction, develop common assessments, and design lessons;
  • Plan common mathematics lessons in a consistent format based on the division Program of Studies (POS), to include the Virginia Mathematics Process Goals;
  • Analyze common assessments using the “Here’s What, So What, Now What” protocol and plan intervention and enrichment for students, by name and by need, based on this analysis;
  • Plan and implement Number Talks in each grade level to further enhance conceptual understanding of mathematical concepts and build a bank of strategies for students in their mathematical reasoning.
  • Use grade level common assessments including iReady, assessments included on the division’s Horizon assessment system, released SOL assessment items, exit tickets, end of unit assessments, and teacher observation to monitor student progress and effectiveness of instruction; and
  • Use division resources within the electronic Curriculum Assessment Resource Tool (eCART), including pacing guides, extended scope and sequence, and print resources. Revised October 2016
  • Mathematics Intervention: Continue oversight of reading and math interventions by the RI Core Team in conjunction with grade level teams using the R10 protocol to document interventions. This ten-minute protocol will require grade-level teams to collaborate to identify a specific skill that students find challenging. The teams will then determine an appropriate intervention, identify who is responsible for the intervention, when it will take place, how it will be monitored, and when the follow up discussion will take place to assess student learning and make plans for next steps. Finally, teams will determine if a new skill and/or intervention needs to be targeted. The school-based math resource teacher, instructional coach, and administrators will work together to support this process. Additionally, the EDSL Insight tool will be utilized to document progress and interventions for students receiving Tier 3 math interventions.
  • The Leadership Team will revise the current rubric for performance tasks in mathematics and will then analyze performance tasks at each grade level to ensure alignment and an increasing level of rigor across grade levels, with a particular focus on number sense
  • Mathematics Professional Development: Centre Ridge Elementary will implement the following professional development approaches for mathematics in order to support a guided math model of instruction:
    • Continue a school-wide coaching model that reinforces the instructional practices of classroom and special education teachers,
    • Representative from each grade level will participate in a book study group focusing on the book Guided Math in Action K-5: Building Each student’s Mathematical Proficiency with Small- group Instruction,
    • Based on areas for growth determined through a needs assessment, the instructional coach and team leaders will lead grade level teams in reading and discussing relevant articles and books to help build their mathematics conceptual understanding and to help them develop lessons that are meaningful, purposeful, and engaging for students, including Teaching Mathematics Developmentally by John Van de Walle as a primary resource for this professional development, and
    • With guidance from the grade level lead teacher and instructional coach, teachers will develop deep understanding of the Virginia Mathematics Process Goals. 

Literacy: Based on the data analysis above, the following practices were identified as ones that would strengthen student achievement in literacy.

  • Vocabulary and Strategy Development: Lessons will be designed to scaffold language and incorporate explicit content vocabulary so that all students can access the key understandings and vocabulary prior to the unit of study. Evidence of lesson design will be lesson plans, collaborative team meeting agendas and discussions of lessons as well as classroom observations. Think-alouds will be modeled by the Reading teacher and classroom teachers to show how strategies can be used for reading comprehension, based on a book study of Word Nerds: Teaching All Students to Learn and Love Vocabulary by Brenda Overturf, Leslie Montgomery, and Margot Holmes Smith.
  • Collaborative Practices in Literacy: All grade level teams will:
    • Develop and use grade level common assessments that consist of assessments from the division Horizon assessment system, released SOL assessment items, exit tickets, and/or teacher observations such as running records and anecdotal notes to monitor student progress and effectiveness of instruction,
    • Use division resources within eCART, including pacing guides, extended scope and sequence, assessments, and instructional materials,
    • Continue and deepen current practices by CLTs in analysis of data to determine each student’s strengths and needs to inform instructional practices,
    • Focus on language arts instruction during a weekly, one-hour CLT meeting,
    • Continue to use the Lucy Calkins units of study for writing in all grade levels, and expand the use of the units for reading in all grade levels,
    • Determine instructional focus for small group and whole group reading instruction based on Developmental Reading Assessments (DRA2) and iReady, and
    • Continue to utilize support from the instructional coach, reading specialist, and resource teacher to improve language arts instruction and to facilitate CLT work.
  • Literacy Intervention: Students in grade K-6 will be identified for reading intervention based on the division beginning-of-year assessment, classroom observation, formative assessments, and other division assessment information, including iReady and supplemental assessments such as Core Phonics. Teachers will utilize a protocol to guide and document Responsive Instruction Interventions utilizing the Responsive 10 (R10) process. This ten-minute protocol will require grade-level teams to collaborate to identify a specific skill that students find challenging to learn. The teams will then determine an appropriate intervention, identify who is responsible for the intervention, when it will take place, how it will be monitored and when the follow up discussion will take place. Finally, teams will determine if a new skill and/or intervention needs to be targeted. The reading specialist, instructional coach, and administrators will work together to support this process.
  • Literacy Professional Development: Centre Ridge Elementary will implement the following professional development approaches for literacy:
    • Continue a school-wide coaching model that reinforces the instructional practices of classroom and special education teachers,
    • Professional development will be provided by Reading teacher and the Literacy PD Committee based on the book, The Literacy Teacher’s Playbook Four Steps for Turning Assessment Data into Goal-Directed Instruction focusing on the steps of implementing guided reading and implementation of strong focus lessons to meet the needs of all students,
    • Classroom teachers will continue staff development during weekly Collaborative Learning team meetings, facilitated by the Reading teachers, focusing on components of literacy instruction included in Lucy Calkins units of study in reading and writing,
    • Collaborative Teams will have a professional development focus that supports individual team needs. Examples may include: Teacher training on using and analyzing running records, guided reading training, and phonics instruction for older learners,
    • Ongoing professional development will be provided by the ESOL team and reading specialist for staff on meeting the needs of English learners, and
    • Collaborative Literature Circles will be implemented in AAP classrooms.

Methods to evaluate effectiveness:

  • Student achievement will be closely monitored in all subject areas in a variety of ways including but not limited to exit tickets, formative assessments, division assessments, DRA2, and iReady. This data will be analyzed regularly in CLTs to guide instructional decisions. Most student data will be housed in the Education Decision Support Library (EDSL). 
  • Grade level teams will document the work done in CLTs to strengthen Tier 1 instruction including unpacking content, lesson plans, creation of assessments, and an analysis of assessment data.

Budget Implications: Title I funding will be allocated to the following: 1 instructional coach, 1 Literacy Resource teacher who works directly with students in small groups and in inclusion settings; data dialogue and curriculum planning day hourly pay for teachers and funding seats for teachers to attend LETRS training.

Component 3 §1114(b)(7)(ii):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that use methods and instructional strategies that strengthen the academic program in the school; increase the amount and quality of learning time; and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum, which may include programs, activities, and courses necessary to provide a well-rounded education.

Evidence: Scientifically-based research strategies or activities that strengthen and enrich the academic program by: extending the school day; embedding reading and/or mathematics curricula into other instructional areas; or other strategies as appropriate. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative

Instructional Practice:

  • Number Talks: Number Talks promote number sense, mental math, communication, and a variety of math strategies for students at grades K-6. The Title I office has provided direct support to grade level teams in their implementation of Number Talks and grade level CLTs discuss and plan for Number Talks collaboratively.
  • Supplemental Literacy and Math Teacher: Additional reading and math resource teachers will collaborate with the instructional coach and current reading teacher to provide professional learning for teachers during grade level CLT meetings.

Amount and Quality of Learning Time:

  • Designated Math Intervention & Enrichment Time: Students in kindergarten through sixth grade will be identified for mathematics intervention and enrichment by name and by need based on the mathematics assessments, classroom observation, anecdotal notes, and additional formative and summative assessments. Mathematics intervention and enrichment will be implemented during a designated time by each grade level. The program TenMarks will be used with students in third through sixth grade needing medium-intensity intervention. 
  • Professional Development: Centre Ridge Elementary will implement the following professional development approaches for improving the quality of learning time to achieve these strategies:
  • CLT focus at least once monthly on pacing and application of the daily instructional block for literacy, mathematics, and science.

Enriching and Accelerating Student Learning:

  • Rigorous Tasks: Use of performance-based tasks that are rich in higher level mathematics will allow students opportunities to practice problem solving, critical thinking, reasoning, and communication skills. Data is collected quarterly to document student progress on the rubric.
  • Supplemental Advanced Academics Resource Teacher Support: Extending time for the Advanced Academics Resource Teacher (AART) to full time allows this individual to more consistently share resources and work collaboratively with grade level teams to support high expectations and use of higher order Bloom’s questioning. The AART will also support students directly by working in small groups for identified students and in whole group critical and creative thinking lessons.
  • Develop plans using the framework of Project Based Learning (PBL) to create authentic learning that promotes open-ended inquiry, thinking skills, and metacognition through incorporation of various resources, such as those promoted by the Buck Institute for Education and Harvard’s Project Zero to develop interdisciplinary units during their CLTs that combine thinking routines and student-directed learning experiences.
  • Advanced Mathematics is offered in grades 3-6 to give students who require enrichment and advanced study early access to above grade level content to support algebra readiness. We also offer a local level IV in grades 3-6.
  • Professional Development: Centre Ridge Elementary will implement the following professional development approaches for enriching and accelerating student learning to achieve these strategies:
  • Coaching from the AART and instructional coach for teachers in applying rigorous tasks and higher order questions.
  • School-wide and grade level professional development from the AART regarding the curricular resources from the AAP office.

Methods for evaluating effectiveness:

  • Student achievement will be closely monitored in all subject areas in a variety of ways including but not limited to exit tickets, formative assessments, division assessments, DRA2, and student interviews. This data will be analyzed regularly in CLTs to guide instructional decisions. Most student data will be housed in the Education Decision Support Library (EDSL).
  • Grade level teams will document the work done in CLTs to strengthen Tier 1 instruction including unpacking content, lesson plans, creation of assessments, and an analysis of assessment data.

Budget Implications: Title I funding will be used to support Title I math and Literacy Resource teacher positions that will support professional learning, CLT development and model effective pedagogical strategies for teachers. Title I funds will also allow for CLT planning days four times throughout the year.

Component 4 §1114(b)(7)(iii):

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs those at risk of not meeting the challenging state academic standards, through activities which may include—

  • Counseling, school-based mental health programs, specialized instructional support services, mentoring services, and other strategies to improve students’ skills outside the academic subject areas,
  • Preparation for and awareness of opportunities for postsecondary education and the workforce, which may include career and technical education programs and broadening secondary school students’ access to coursework to earn postsecondary credit while still in high school (such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, dual or concurrent enrollment, or early college high schools),
  • Implementation of a schoolwide tiered model to prevent and address problem behavior, and early intervening services, coordinated with similar activities and services carried out under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.),
  • Professional development and other activities for teachers, paraprofessionals, and other school personnel to improve instruction and use of data from academic assessments, and to recruit and retain effective teachers, particularly in high-need subjects, and
  • Strategies for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood education programs to local elementary school programs and, if programs are consolidated, the specific state educational agency and local education agency programs and other federal programs that will be consolidated in the schoolwide program.

Evidence: Scientifically-based research strategies or activities such as student support services; behavior intervention systems; tiered systems of support; teacher recruitment and/or retention activities; or other activities as appropriate. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative

Social, Emotional, and Mental Health:

  • Specific supports for students with social and emotional challenges will expand to include the Brain Lab, a sensory-friendly and mindfulness space for identified students on a regularly-scheduled basis.
  • The creation of a full-time behavior resource teacher to support students with crisis-level behaviors, as well as support teachers with classroom management and the creation of a positive classroom community.
  • Piloting a social-emotional curriculum, Zones of Regulation, in third grade to support students as they learn to identify, name and manage their emotions.
  • Business and Faith-Based Partnerships: Centre Ridge Elementary will receive continued support from community business partners and faith-based groups for economically disadvantaged students. These partners will help by supplying backpacks and school supplies each fall and during the holiday season. These partners will also provide resources for families who are in need of supplies to support learning. The faith-based partner also provides nutritional food for students through the weekend food program. The parent liaisons will work closely with the business and faith-based partners to provide a strong school-family connection.
  • Professional Development : Centre Ridge Elementary will implement the following professional development approaches for building flexibility and resilience to achieve these strategies:
    • Trauma-informed supervisor training for administrators, the school counselor, social worker, psychologist and behavior resource teacher.
    • Trauma 101 sessions scheduled during a school planning during the fall.

Behavior and Goal-Directed Learning:

  • Progressive Ongoing Feedback: Teachers will continue to provide parents with feedback on their students’ behavioral and social progress through various modes of communication including home visits, phone calls, conferences, and notes home. Student progress reports will continue to be sent home quarterly to document students’ growth.
  • Professional Development: Centre Ridge Elementary will implement the following professional development approaches for establishing positive, productive classroom culture to achieve these strategies:
    • Responsive Classroom training for all staff.
    • Cultural Proficiency training for all staff.

School Readiness and Transitions:

  • Bridge to Kindergarten: A three-week extended orientation program will be offered to all rising kindergarten students so that they can be better prepared for the transition to kindergarten. Through this program, students will begin to form relationships with school staff and peers, as well as learn the classroom routines and expectations. This will also provide an opportunity to assess student readiness levels so that students in need of intervention are identified early.
  • Special Education Preschool and Head Start Transition: Preschool students who are in special education classes in the division will be observed by a Centre Ridge ES special education teacher prior to the transition from preschool to kindergarten. Centre Ridge ES kindergarten teachers will visit Head Start classes serving rising kindergarten students and discuss each student’s strengths and needs with the Head Start teachers.
  • Kindergarten Orientation: Kindergarten Orientation will be held in April for the parents and students. Parents will receive information about the kindergarten curriculum and ways to develop kindergarten readiness. Children will visit kindergarten classrooms, and literacy and numeracy skills will be assessed. Families will receive kindergarten readiness materials translated into multiple home languages.
  • Professional Development: Centre Ridge Elementary will implement the following professional development approaches for building and sustaining readiness for learning to achieve these strategies:
    • Training for caregivers, in conjunction with the Office for Children, to support the social-emotional needs of very young children.
    • Training in effective parent communication related to children’s transition to kindergarten.
    • Training for all kindergarten teachers and assistants in the executive function skills featured in the Bridge to Kindergarten curriculum.

Methods to evaluate effectiveness: Student office referral data will be closely monitored throughout the school year. A school team will analyze the data for trends at the end of the year, identifying what further professional learning and supports might be needed. Kindergarten entry data will be reviewed to help identify success of school readiness initiatives.

Budget Implications: Title I funds will be used to support additional hours for our parent liaison to support family connections.

Virginia Dept of Education Quality Profile

Profiles were developed by the state Board of Education to more effectively communicate to parents and the public about the performance of Virginia’s public schools.

Title I in FCPS

Providing fair, equitable, and high-quality education for all.